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Keats and Shelley, the Protestant cemetery and the cats of Rome
Keats and Shelley, the Protestant cemetery and the cats of Rome
Sat, 18 Dec 2:00 PM - Italy
After Oscar Wilde visited the Cimitero Acattolico in Rome in 1877, he wrote to the Reverend J Page Hopps, “Keats’s grave is a hillock of grass with a plain headstone, and it is to me the holiest place in Rome” (The Letters of Oscar Wilde, 1962). Keats had been laid to rest here in February 1821. His fellow romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley had interred his and his wife Mary Shelley’s three-year-old son William here in 1819. In the preface to Adonais, Shelley’s soaring pastoral elegy to Keats, he wrote, “The cemetery is an open space among the ruins, covered in winter with violets and daisies. It might make one in love with death, to think that one should be buried in so sweet a place.” Just 23 months after Keats’s death, Shelley’s ashes were also placed in the cemetery. We will talk about the poets reading some poetries surrounded by the beauty of the pyramid and one of the largest cats community of Rome
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